Maryland Public Opinion Survey on Substance Use:
Carroll County 2019 Data Profile 

The Behavioral Health Resources and Technical Assistance Team (BHRT) at the University of Maryland Baltimore conducted the Maryland Public Opinion Survey (MPOS) in Winter of 2019. The purpose of the MPOS is to collect state and jurisdiction-level data on substance misuse, perceptions, and opinions.  

The following data profile highlights some key findings from data collected in Carroll County. 

Key Findings in Carroll County

To assess people's perceptions of prescription opioid and heroin misuse, respondents were asked how concerned they were about abuse in their communities. The majority or Carroll County residents reported being "very concerned" about both prescription opioid and heroin misuse in their community:

Respondents to the survey were also asked about their perception of harm cause by misusing prescription opioids and using heroin. In Carroll County, the majority of respondents to these questions believed both misusing prescription opioids and using heroin posed a great risk of harm to people. Overall, respondents believed using heroin posed more harm than misusing prescription opioids. 




The MPOS also asked respondents if they or anyone they knew had experienced barriers to accessing treatment for addiction. Respondents could select multiple barriers. In Carroll County, the most commonly reported barriers to accessing treatment were the cost of treatment, long wait lists or complicated admissions processes, and not knowing where to go for treatment.

Carroll County respondents were also asked questions to gauge their understanding of best practices around storing and disposing of prescription opioids and their awareness of safe storage and disposal campaigns in their community. Respondents were given a list of common disposal and storage methods andasked to select the methods they thought were appropriate. 

To assess the reach of state and local education strategies, survey respondents were asked several questions related to prescription opioid storage and disposal education. When asked if they knew the location of at least one prescription drug disposal box in their county or city, 45% (N=351) of Carroll County respondents answered "Yes." Respondents were also asked if they had seen or heard any information about safe prescription drug disposal or storage in the past year. A majority of respondents in Carroll County (57%) had seen messaging around safe prescription drug disposal within the previous year, whereas only 41% reported having seen messaging around safe prescription drug storage during that time: 

In addition to outreach to the general public, Maryland state and Carroll County have also worked directly with the medical community to identify and implement best practices around opioid prescribing and education. Survey respondents were asked several questions to evaluate the success of outreach efforts with doctors' offices and pharmacists. All survey respondents were asked if they had ever seen information about the dangers of prescription opioids at their doctor's office or pharmacy. In Carroll County, 39% of respondents reported that they had seen information about the dangers of prescription opioids at their doctor's office, and 38% of people reported that they had seen this information at their pharmacy.  

Respondents who reported that someone in their household was prescribed an opioids within the past year were asked more specific questions about their experiences with doctors and pharmacies. These questions included what types of information about prescription opioids their doctors and pharmacists discussed with them. 


Respondents were also asked about their knowledge of the Good Samaritan Law (GSL) and their willingness to call 911 if they witness an overdose. Maryland's Good Samaritan Law protects people who assist in emergency situations (like a drug overdose) from prosecution. According to the MPOS, 83% of Carroll County respondents reported hearing about the GSL and almost 85% of respondents in Carroll County reported that they were "extremely likely" to call 911 if they saw someone overdosing on opioids. 

On-Going Strategies to Reduce Opioid Misuse in Carroll County

Quote about prevention work or substance misuse

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[Highlights or summary of substance misuse strategies in Carroll County.]

For more information about substance misuse data and programs in Carroll County, please contact Michelle McVay at michelle.mcvay@maryland.gov.

For more information about the Maryland Public Opinion Survey, please contact the Behavioral Health Resources and Technical Assistance Team at BHRT@rx.umaryland.edu.