COVID-19

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory illness that can spread from person to person. The virus that causes COVID-19 is a novel coronavirus that was first identified during an investigation into an outbreak in Wuhan, China. COVID-19 is a rapidly evolving situation and the City of Nashua, including the Nashua Division of Public Health and Community Services (DPHCS), is doing their best to keep the Greater Nashua community informed. Information about COVID-19 will be continuously updated as it is available here

COVID-19 Metrics

Hover over Nashua, Manchester, or the county of interest to see the data for the selected metrics below. 

COVID-19 Community Based Transmission and School Metrics

We continue to experience substantial community level transmission of COVID-19 in Nashua. 

Substantial community level transmission is determined by three metrics established in conjunction with the State of New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). When any one of the metrics exceeds the set threshold, a community is designated as "RED" or substantial. Currently, in Nashua, we are exceeding the thresholds set on two metrics: new infections per 100k and the 7-day total test positivity rate.

New cases per 100k over 14 days

Number of new cases within 14 days standardized by population size to compare across groups. This tells us how quickly disease is occurring in the community.

New Hosp per 100k over 14 days

Number of new hospitalizations within 14 days standardized by population size to compare across groups. This is the number of NEW hospitalizations, which tells us how quickly the hospitals are being burdened by disease. 

7-day test positivity rate

The number of PCR and antigen tests that are positive compared to the number of PCR and antigen tests that are negative over the past 7 days. This gives us an indication of how the general community at large is impacted by COVID-19. 

Nashua School District

For data on current active, recovered, and student and staff cases associated with transmission in the Nashua School District, please us the interactive map below. These are cases where the individual was onsite at the institution in close proximity to the period of infection. This is not representative of all school-aged cases in the City of Nashua. 

Click the dropdown under 'Show Map By', click 'NH Counties', then choose 'Nashua'. 

COVID-19 Testing

PCR Test

Detects active COVID-19 infection. Typically done via nasal or oral swab.

Get the PCR test here.  

Antigen Test

Detects active COVID-19 infection, and is most useful when testing symptomatic individuals. 

Get the rapid Antigen test here

Antibody Test

Detects COVID-19 antibodies, and can determine if a person was sick with COVID-19 in the past. 

COVID-19 Trends

We are currently experiencing a second surge of COVID-19 in Nashua, New Hampshire, and across the country. Check out the charts below to explore trends across sectors in New Hampshire. 

Interested in global or national trends? Check out the resources below. 

United States Confirmed Case Trends 

by the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center 

Global COVID-19 Case Dashboard 

by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering 

COVID-19 Case Forecasting 

by the Centers for Disease  Control and Prevention

COVID-19 Demographics

Racial and ethnic minorities are disproportionally impacted by COVID-19. The City of Nashua Division of Public Health and Community Services prioritizes these populations when conducting disease investigation and contact tracing. 

Health Equity & COVID-19

Discrimination and bias in the health care system has contributed to the COVID-19 pandemic’s dramatic impact on Black, Latino and Native American populations. These communities have faced disproportionate numbers of cases, hospitalizations, and/or deaths while experiencing documented barriers to testing and treatment (New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute).

• Compared to white Americans, Latinos & American Indian or Alaska Natives are hospitalized at 3.9x the rate, Black Americans are hospitalized at 3.6x the rate, Black Americans are dying at 2x the rate, American Indian or Alaska Natives are dying at 1.5x the rate, and Latinos are dying at 1.3x the rate (National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation).

• Counties with a higher percentage of people of color had longer travel times to a COVID-19 testing location (National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation).

• Zip codes with predominantly white populations had more COVID-19 testing sites per capita than zip codes with predominantly Black populations (National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation).

• Access to COVID-19 testing was lower in rural areas, and rural Black Americans were 1.7x as likely to be in a testing desert than the general rural population (National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation).

• Studies show that minority patients benefit from having a minority doctor, but under-representation in the workforce limits these pairings. Black people make up only 5% of all doctors in the U.S., and Latinos only 5.8% (National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation).

•  Initial federal relief funding (distributed based on revenue) resulted in smaller hospitals with large numbers of Black patients receiving disproportionately lower funding to manage a greater COVID-19 burden. Hospitals in predominantly Black communities had less funding for resources like testing and protective equipment (National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation).

Click the buttons below to explore other resources related to COVID-19

Do you have questions or comments about the information on this site?

Call the Nashua COVID-19 Hotline at 603-589-3456.