Demographics

We recognize that the greatest issue that we need help with is racial disparity in Tulsa.

—Mayor G.T. Bynum, 2017

Demographics, which is information about the population of a particular geographic area such as Tulsa County, Oklahoma, or the United States, is important because many decisions are made based on this information. This data influences where and how social services are targeted, how federal aid is distributed, and how many representatives your geographic area has in state and federal legislatures. 

The demographic data in this section is from the US Census or American Community Survey. The US Census is conducted every ten years and seeks to count every person in the United States, while the American Community Survey is done annually and serves as a representative sample of geographic regions. 

Demographic data is also important because it can identify populations that are at a higher risk of specific illnesses or health outcomes. Tracking demographic trends over time can help illustrate where populations are moving and changing, and where there may be increased need for services, infrastructure, or other investments in a community (1).

Total Population

Definition

The total population is presented simply as the number of individuals living in each zip code, according to the 2016 5-year population estimates by the American Community Survey.


Why is this indicator important?

The numeric size of the population is used as the basis for deriving many of the rates for the community health indicators presented later in this report, such as zip code specific rates and gender, age, and racial/ethnic specific rates.


How are we doing?

Tulsa County had an estimated population of 629,823 individuals in 2016. Overall, the female population (51.2 percent) slightly exceeded the male population (48.8 percent). At lower age ranges, males outnumbered females; however, the opposite was true in older age groups. In fact, females comprised almost 60 percent of the population age 65 and older. Tulsa County’s median age (35.4 years) was slightly younger than the state’s median age (36.2 years) and the median age of the nation (37.7 years). 

Overall, Tulsa County had a very similar age breakdown to Oklahoma and the US, although Tulsa County has a slightly lower percentage of residents age 65+.

Whites comprised 70.6 percent of the population and blacks made up the largest minority race at 9.9 percent. In general, Tulsa County was less diverse than the United States overall, but more diverse than Oklahoma. The exception to this is American Indians/ Alaskan Natives, in which the inverse is true.

Hispanics comprised 11.8 percent of the population in 2016, although that is likely an underestimation because of potential under counting of undocumented Hispanic immigrants. Similarly to race, Tulsa County had a higher percentage of Hispanic residents than Oklahoma, but less than the United States.

It should be noted that race and ethnicity are separate concepts. Individuals of Hispanic origin are those who indicate that their country of origin is Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Central or South America, or some other Hispanic origin, and can be of any race. Non-Hispanic refers to all people whose ethnicity is not Hispanic.

The top three zip codes with the highest population were in Broken Arrow, south Tulsa, and Owasso:

1. 74012 (61,534 residents)

2. 74133 (45,377 residents)

3. 74055 (42,764 residents)

Zip codes 74012 and 74133 are both fully in Tulsa County; 74055 is in Tulsa and Rogers County. The population referenced above is for the entire zip code.

Minority Populations

Definition

The distribution of the non-white population is expressed as the percentage of the total population within each zip code who did not report being white, non-Hispanic, based on 2016 American Community Survey 5-year estimates.


Why is this indicator important?

There are many health inequalities that affect minorities in the United States. For example, some minorities have a disproportionate burden of preventable disease, death, and disability compared to non-minorities (2).


How are we doing?

An estimated 229,205 Tulsa County residents were non-white in 2016. This was a total of 36.4 percent of Tulsa County residents, which was higher than Oklahoma (33.1 percent), and lower than the US (38 percent). The percentage of non-white residents has been steadily increasing in each of these locations since 2011.

The Tulsa County non-white population had a higher percentage of 0-4 and 5-14 year olds compared to the US and Oklahoma, but less individuals age 65+.

The non-white population was shown to reside primarily in the city of Tulsa, with the highest percentages concentrated in north and east Tulsa.

Data for specific races/ethnicities is presented in following sections:

1. Black population

2. Asian population

3. Hispanic population


Black Population

Definition

The distribution of the black population is expressed as the percentage of the total population within each zip code who reported being black, based on 2016 American Community Survey 5-year estimates.


Why is this indicator important?

In the US, the death rate for blacks is generally higher than whites for heart disease, stroke, cancer, asthma, influenza and pneumonia, HIV/AIDS, and homicide, many of which are preventable disease. Additionally, black Americans tend to have lower rates of educational attainment, lower incomes, and lower rates of private insurance coverage, all of which can have impacts on health outcomes (3).


How are we doing?

Blacks comprised the largest minority race in Tulsa County with an estimated population of 62,574 in 2016. Data from 2016 indicate that blacks comprised 9.9 percent of Tulsa County’s population, compared with 7.3 percent of Oklahoma and 12.6 percent of the nation.

Overall, 47.5 percent of blacks were male and 52.5 percent were female. The Tulsa County black population had a higher percentage of 0-4 and 5-14 year olds compared to the US and Oklahoma, but less individuals age 65+. 

The black population was shown to reside primarily in the city of Tulsa, with the highest percentages in zip codes 74106 and 74126.


Asian Population

Definition

The distribution of the Asian population is expressed as the percentage of the total population within each zip code who reported being Asian, based on 2016 American Community Survey 5-year estimates.


Why is this indicator important?

Asians have a high prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, hepatitis B, HIV/AIDS, smoking, tuberculosis, and liver disease. In 2015, the case rate of TB in Asians was 30 times higher than that of the non-Hispanic white population.

Socioeconomic status varies widely among Asian subgroups in the US. For example, the median household income among Asian Americans was ~$15,000 higher than that of non-Hispanic whites, but a higher percentage of Asian Americans live in poverty compared to non-Hispanic whites. Additionally, the poverty rate for Filipinos was 6.5 percent, while it was 24.2 percent for the Hmong in 2015 (4). 


How are we doing?

There were an estimated 17,950 Asian residents in Tulsa County in 2016, which was 2.9 percent of the total population. This is higher than Oklahoma (2 percent), but lower than the US (5.2 percent). Although this percentage is low in Tulsa County, it has been steadily increasing since 2013. 

The Tulsa County Asian population had a higher percentage of 0-4 and 5-14 year olds compared to the US and Oklahoma, but less individuals age 65+.

The zip codes with the highest Asian populations were 74133, 74136 74137, and 74134. 


Hispanic Population

Definition

The distribution of the Hispanic population in Tulsa County is expressed as a percentage of the total population within each zip code, based on 2016 American Community Survey 5-year estimates.


Why is this indicator important?

Based on US Census data, the Hispanic population in Tulsa County has been increasing since 2000. However, there are many barriers which can lead to inequalities in health care and preventive services among this group, such as education and income. Health disparities among Hispanics include high rates of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, HIV/AIDS, suicide, liver disease and obesity. Hispanics also have a disproportionately higher uninsured rate compared to non-Hispanics, as well as lower rates of educational attainment (5).


How are we doing?

According to the 2016 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, the Hispanic population numbered 74,451 in Tulsa County. However, due to the potential under counting of undocumented Hispanic immigrants, the number was likely much higher. 

In 2016, Hispanics comprised 12.5 percent of the Tulsa County population, which was higher than the state value of 9.8 percent, but lower than the U.S. percentage of 17.3 percent. Again, these were likely all underestimates of the true size of the population.

The Tulsa County Hispanic population had a higher percentage of 0-4 and 5-14 year olds compared to the US and Oklahoma, but less individuals age 65+.

The Tulsa County zip codes with the highest percentages of Hispanics were concentrated in north and east Tulsa.

Immigrant Populations


Foreign-born Population

Definition

The distribution of the foreign-born population in Tulsa County is expressed as a percentage of the total population within each zip code that reported they were not born in the US, based on 2016 American Community Survey 5-year estimates.


Why is this indicator important?

Undocumented residents and immigrants face a variety of challenges: insurance eligibility, safety net eligibility, limited English proficiency, isolation from social networks, and stigma and marginalization. All of these can lead to poor health outcomes and/or decreased quality of life (6).


How are we doing?

Overall, a total of 53,049 Tulsa County residents reported that they were born outside of the United States. This was a percentage of 8.4 percent, which was higher than Oklahoma (5.8 percent), but lower than the US (13.2 percent).

A total of 5.9 percent of Tulsa County residents reported that they were not US citizens. This was higher than Oklahoma (3.9 percent), but lower than the United States (7.0 percent). It is important to note that this indicator is likely an under counting, based on real or perceived concerns associated with indicating lack of US citizenship.

The Tulsa County zip code with the highest percentage of foreign-born residents was 74146 in east Tulsa.


Households with Limited English Proficiency

Definition

A 'limited English speaking household' is one in which no member 14 years old and over speaks only English or speaks a non-English language and speaks English 'very well.' This was previously (before 2015) referred to as a 'linguistically isolated household.' Households with limited English proficiency in Tulsa County are expressed as a percentage of the total households within each zip code, based on 2016 American Community Survey 5-year estimates. 


Why is this indicator important?

Residents who have limited English proficiency may struggle to access services (6), education, or higher paying employment opportunities (7). Although not all limited English proficient households are necessarily immigrants, this indicator can serve as a proxy for populations that may need additional outreach or services in order to achieve optimal outcomes. 


How are we doing?

Overall, a total of 7,866 Tulsa County households reported that they were limited English proficiency. This was a percentage of 3.2 percent, which was higher than Oklahoma (2.2 percent), but lower than the US (4.5 percent). These percentages were virtually unchanged from 2015. 

The Tulsa County zip code with the highest percentage of limited English proficiency households was 74146 in east Tulsa.

Age Groups

Definition

The age distribution of Tulsa County residents is expressed as a percentage of the total population within the age groups 0-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-64, and 65+, based on 2016 American Community Survey 5-year estimates. These age groups are also expressed as percentages of specific races/ethnicities.


Why is this indicator important?

It is important to track age distribution of the total population, as well as within races/ethnicities, as older or younger populations may create challenges and/or burdens on social services in the community (8,9). Additionally, different age groups can have increased likelihood of specific health behaviors or outcomes (10). Lastly, a healthy working age population contributes significantly to the overall economic strength and vitality of a community (11).


How are we doing?

Overall, Tulsa County had a very similar age breakdown to Oklahoma and the US, although Tulsa County has a slightly lower percentage of residents age 65+ (chart in 'Total Population' section). In regards to race/ethnicity, Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders and Hispanics had the highest percentage of children under 5 (12.8 percent and 12.5 percent, respectively). Hispanics had the highest percentage of youth 5 - 14. Hispanics and blacks had the highest percentage of young adults 15-24 (16.8 and 16.7 percent, respectively). Native Hawaiians had the highest percentage of adults 25-64 (59.4 percent). Hispanics had the lowest percentage of adults 25-64 and 65+ (44.8 and 2.8 percent, respectively). In fact, the percentage of Hispanics age 65+ was more than four times less than the overall percentage of adults 65+ in Tulsa County. Whites had the highest percentage of adults 65+ (15.8 percent). 


Young Children Age 0–4

Definition

This indicator is presented as the percentage of the total population age 0 to 4 years, based on 2016 American Community Survey 5-year estimates.


Why is this indicator important?

Young children are especially vulnerable to unintentional injuries, lead poisoning, infectious diseases, and abuse and neglect, which are conditions that are largely preventable and open to public health interventions (8).


How are we doing?

In 2016, there were approximately 46,488 children ages 0 to 4 years living in Tulsa County.

The proportion of very young children was highest among Native Hawaiian/ Pacific Islanders (12.8 percent). Children in this age group made up 12.5 percent of the Hispanic population, which was almost double that of non-Hispanics (6.7 percent).

In 2016, Tulsa County had a higher proportion of very young children (7.4 percent) than Oklahoma (6.9 percent) and the nation (6.2 percent).

Zip codes 74116 and 74117 had the highest percentages of children ages 0 – 4. 


Young Adults Age 15–24

Definition

This indicator is presented as the percentage of the total population age 15 – 24 years, based on 2016 American Community Survey 5-year estimates.


Why is this indicator important?

Adolescents and young adults are particularly sensitive to environmental influences, which makes them susceptible to risky behaviors and social problems that can determine their current health status and their risk for developing chronic diseases in adulthood. Examples of behaviors and social problems that often start or peak during these years include homicide, suicide, motor vehicle accidents, substance abuse, smoking, sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS, teen and unplanned pregnancies, and homelessness. Addressing the positive development of young people facilitates their adoption of healthy behaviors and helps to ensure a healthy and productive future adult population (9).


How are we doing?

In 2016, this age group included 83,930 individuals, or 13.3 percent of the total population. American Indians/ Alaskan Native had the highest proportion of individuals in this age group (17 percent), followed by blacks (16.7 percent). Individuals in this age group made up 16.8 percent of the Hispanic population.

In 2016, Tulsa County had a lower proportion of individuals age 15 – 24 (13.3 percent) than Oklahoma (14 percent) and the U.S. (13.8 percent).

Zip codes with the highest proportion of individuals age 15 – 24 included 74104 and 74117.


Adults Age 25–64

Definition

This indicator represents the percentage of the total population age 25 – 64 years, based on 2016 American Community Survey 5-year estimates.


Why is this indicator important?

This age group represents working-age adults that significantly contribute to the work force and the economy. The health of this age group is especially important for a healthy and productive economy. Research indicates that employees are more productive in the workplace if they are both physically and mentally healthy (10).


How are we doing?

In 2016, this age group numbered 328,791 individuals. Native Hawaiian/ Pacific Islanders and Asians had a higher percentage of the population in this age group (59.4 percent and 56.5 percent, respectively) than the other races. Individuals in this age group accounted for 44.8 percent of the Hispanic population.

In 2016, 52.2 percent of Tulsa County residents were ages 25 – 64, compared to 50.9 percent of Oklahomans and 52.6 percent of the national population.

The zip code with the highest percentage of individuals in this age group was 74103 in downtown Tulsa.


Adults Age 65 and Older

Definition

This indicator represents the percentage of the total population age 65 years and older, based on 2016 American Community Survey 5-year estimates.


Why is this indicator important?

Due to increased life expectancies, the proportion of adults age 65 and older is growing faster than ever before. However, many older adults struggle with chronic disease, falls, and mental health and substance abuse issues which can negatively impact their quality of life (11).


How are we doing?

In 2016, Tulsa County had 81,842 residents age 65 and older, which was 13 percent of the total population. The proportion of the white population age 65 and older was almost double the next highest percentage (15.8 percent compared to 8.1 percent among blacks). Individuals in this age group made up only 2.8 percent of the Hispanic population.

In 2016, 13 percent of Tulsa County residents were age 65 and older, which was lower than both Oklahoma and the US (14.5 percent each). 

The zip codes with the highest percentage of individuals in this age group were 74063, 74105, 74114, 74119, 74131, 74135, and 74137. 

Population Change

Definition

This demographic indicator is presented as the percentage change in the population within each zip code from the 2011 American Community Survey to the 2016 American Community Survey (5-year estimates). There was minimal change in zip code boundaries in this intervening period.


Why is this indicator important?

Trends in general population growth and decline help target specific locations and/or demographic groups where public health efforts should be focused in order to ensure adequate access to community-based programs.


How are we doing?

With the exception of Sperry, all cities in Tulsa County experienced growth from 2011 to 2016. Jenks was the fastest growing city, with a 23.3 percent increase in population from 2011 to 2016. 

Although most racial and ethnic populations increased from 2011 to 2016, the black population decreased. The most striking growth occurred in the Asian population, which was estimated to have a 31.5 percent increase from 2011 – 2016. 

Overall, Tulsa County had a 5.5 percent population increase. This was slightly higher than both Oklahoma and the US (4.3 percent and 3.9 percent, respectively).

The zip codes with the highest percent population change were generally in the north and south suburbs of Tulsa (Broken Arrow, Bixby, Jenks, Owasso, Glenpool, Skiatook).

It is important to note that small changes in small populations would lead to a larger percent population increase than a population that is larger. For example, an equal amount of population increase in both the white and Asian populations would lead to a much higher percent population increase in the Asian population.


Black Population Change

Overall, the black population in Tulsa County decreased by 0.7 percent from 2011 - 2016. 

Many of the zip codes with percent population loss were in the city of Tulsa. Conversely, many of the suburbs saw an increase in black percent population. 

It is important to note that if a zip code had a small black population initially, small increases would lead to larger percent population changes, compared to zip codes that had higher black populations originally.


Asian Population Change

Overall, the Asian population in Tulsa County increased by 31.5 percent from 2011 - 2016.

The zip code with the highest Asian percent population change in Tulsa County was 74114, which is in midtown Tulsa.

It is important to note that if a zip code had a small Asian population initially, small increases would lead to larger percent population changes, compared to zip codes that had higher Asian populations originally.


Hispanic Population Change

Overall, the Hispanic population in Tulsa County increased by 17.7 percent from 2011 - 2016.

The zip codes with the highest Hispanic percent population change in Tulsa County were 74119 and 74132.

It is important to note that if a zip code had a small Hispanic population initially, small increases would lead to larger percent population changes, compared to zip codes that had higher Hispanic populations originally.

Explore the Data

The charts below allow you to filter the data based on your own needs. There are four sets of charts: zip code, zip code and race/ethnicity, race/ethnicity, and location. The 'population' chart allows you to filter over time for total population. The 'percent of population by race/ethnicity over time' allows you to filter for minority populations. The 'percent population change' charts allow you to filter population change by race/ethnicity. The 'percent' charts allow you to filter over time for all other indicators: immigrant populations and age groups.

Clicking on the blue text within the chart will allow you to choose which indicators and/or zip codes/races/ethnicities/locations you would like to see represented in the chart. Please note that if you choose multiple options, the chart will show you a cumulative total of all populations or percentages selected. It will not show you each indicator separately. Additionally, zip codes must be entered as text.

When selecting years, the year '2011-2016' should only be selected with creating charts with population change. All other indicators should use single years from 2011-2016.

If data is not available due to limitations from the American Community Survey, it will result in a message that says "No data is available for this section."

To download the data, please click here.


By Zip Code

The first chart allows you to compare the total population over time for Tulsa County zip codes. Clicking on a zip code below the chart will remove it from the chart.

The second chart allows you to view the total population for Tulsa County zip codes by year. Click on the blue 'year' to change which year you are viewing.

The next chart allows you see population change from 2011 - 2016 for your chosen race or ethnicity. If you choose multiple races/ethnicities, you will see a cumulative percent.

The next two charts allows you to compare percent indicators (identified above) over time for Tulsa County zip codes. If you chose multiple indicators or years (map only), you will see a cumulative percent- you will not see each separately. Clicking on a zip code below the chart will remove it from the chart.


By Zip Code and Race/Ethnicity

The next two charts allow you to compare population by race/ethnicity over time for Tulsa County zip codes. If you chose multiple races/ethnicities or years (map only), you will see a cumulative percent- you will not see each separately. Clicking on a zip code below the chart will remove it from the chart. Changing the indicator ('population by race/ethnicity') will result in no data available.


By Race/Ethnicity

The chart below allows you to compare races/ethnicities over time for a specific indicator in a specific location (Tulsa County, Oklahoma, or the United States). If you choose multiple indicators or locations, you will see a cumulative percent- you will not see each separately. Clicking on a race/ethnicity below the chart will remove it from the chart.


By Location

The chart below allows you to compare multiple indicators over time for a specific location (Tulsa County, Oklahoma, or the United States). If you choose more than one location, you will see a cumulative percent- you will not see each location separately.