Hospitalizations

Hospitalizations for Prescription Opioid Overdose 

According to OSHPD data, from 2005-2018, there were a total of 10,746 Rx opioid (opioids excluding heroin) overdose-related hospitalizations. The number of Rx drug overdose-related hospitalizations increased by 30.7% from 628 in 2005 to 821 in 2018 (Figure 1). 

Primary Rx opioid overdose hospitalizations accounted for about two-thirds (54%-72% from 2005-2018) of all Rx opioid overdose-related hospitalizations. The number of primary Rx opioid overdose hospitalizations increased 36.2% from 428 in 2005 to 583 in 2015, then decreased 22.3% to 453 in 2018 (Figure 2).  

The rate of prescription opioid overdose hospitalizations were highest in the Antelope Valley region (SPA 1) (Figures 3-4). 

Figure 1. Prescription opioid overdose-related hospitalizations, LAC, 2005-2018
Source: OSHPD

Figure 2. Primary prescription opioid overdose hospitalizations, LAC, 2005-2018
Source: OSHPD

Figure 3. Prescription opioid overdose-related hospitalization rate per 100,000, LAC, 2018

Source: OSHPD

Figure 4. Primary prescription opioid overdose-related hospitalization rate per 100,000, LAC, 2018

Source: OSHPD

Demographics

The number of all Rx opioid overdose-related hospitalizations increased with age (Figure 5). Females accounted for 56% of all Rx opioid overdose-related hospitalizations (Figure 7). Over half of Rx opioid overdose-related hospitalizations were for Whites (57%), followed by Latinxs (22%) and Blacks (13%) (Figure 9). Patterns for primary Rx opioid overdose hospitalizations closely matched that of Rx opioid overdose-related hospitalizations (Figures 6, 8, 10).

Figure 5. Prescription opioid overdose-related hospitalizations, by age, LAC, 2005-2018
Source: OSHPD

Figure 6. Primary prescription opioid overdose hospitalizations, by age, LAC, 2005-2018
Source: OSHPD

Figure 7. Prescription opioid overdose-related hospitalizations, by gender, LAC, 2005-2018
Source: OSHPD

Figure 8. Primary prescription opioid overdose hospitalizations, by gender, LAC, 2005-2018
Source: OSHPD

Figure 9. Prescription opioid overdose-related hospitalizations, by race/ethnicity, LAC, 2005-2018
Source: OSHPD

Figure 10. Primary prescription opioid overdose hospitalizations, by race/ethnicity, LAC, 2005-2018
Source: OSHPD

Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), or drug withdrawal symptoms in newborns, can occur if the mother uses opioids during pregnancy. Newborns hospitalized with NAS increased 158.1% from 86 in 2009 to 222 in 2017, then dropped 28.4% to 159 in 2018 (Figure 11). 

Figure 11. Neonatal abstinence syndrome-related hospitalizations, LAC, 2005-2018
Source: OSHPD

Economic Burden of Prescription Opioid Overdose

Patients with a Rx opioid overdose-related condition stayed in the hospital for an average of 4.5 days. Rx opioid overdose-related hospitalizations accounted for 48,677 hospital days during 2005-2018.

The mean hospital charge for each Rx opioid overdose-related hospitalization in LAC from 2005-2018 was $63,876, and increased from $44,760 in 2005 to $82,060 in 2018 (adjusted for inflation to 2018 US dollars).

From 2005-2018, Rx opioid overdose-related hospitalizations in LAC resulted in $686 million in total spending. The annual Rx opioid-related hospital spending increased from $28.1 million in 2005 to $67.4 million in 2018 (Figure 12).

Figure 12. Annual prescription opioid-related hospital spending, LAC, 2005-2018
Source: OSHPD

References

Figures 1-12.  Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD). Nonpublic Inpatient Discharge and Emergency Department data. California Department of Public Health (CDPH).