Transportation

Work Commute

Expanding transit systems and access to transit through more integrated and walkable land use and development can provide more efficient and affordable travel choices for residents, workers and visitors. Equal viability for non-single occupancy vehicle (SOV) modes of travel – such as walking, biking and transit – are important for the workforce to access job opportunities, as well as for health, quality of life and safety.

Source: American Community Survey (ACS), Single-year estimates; Confidence level: 90 percent

21.9%

Non-SOV Work Commute in Clark County in 2019

23.0%

Non-SOV Work Commute in Nevada in 2019

24.1%

Non-SOV Work Commute in the U.S. in 2019

Non-SOV work commuting still lagging in Southern Nevada

In 2019, 21.9 percent of trips to work in Southern Nevada occurred via modes other than driving alone in a single-occupancy vehicle (SOV), more than 10 percent (and 2.2 percentage points) lower than the national average. Non-SOV work travel in the region did increased slightly  each year between 2016 to 2019, though it has remained fairly stagnant since 2012

Non-SOV modes include: Public transportation, carpooling, walking, bicycling, working from home, and other means such as by taxi or motorcycle.

Locally, the percentage of most non-SOV modes either held steady or decreased since 2012 (see chart below). Telecommuting, however, was the exception, consistently increasing since 2012. The percentage of the Southern Nevadans who worked from home increased approximately 60 percent between 2012 and 2019, though telecommuting still only makes up 4.7 percent of all work commutes in the region in 2019.

The percentage of Southern Nevadans who take a taxi, motorcycle, or other means of transportation to work saw ups and downs since 2012, but overall, increased by just over 100 percent. The increase was likely due to the introduction of ride share to the region in 2015. However, like telecommuting, taking a taxi, motorcycle, or other means of transportation to work still only make up 3.2 percent of all work commutes in the region.

Source: American Community Survey (ACS), Single-year estimates; Confidence level: 90 percent

Southern Nevada continues adding bicycling infrastructure

Bicycling to work remains among the least common ways Southern Nevadans regularly commute to work (never surpassing half a percent between 2012 and 2019). However, the region has taken steps to increase its viability in recent years. Since 2013, more than 150 miles of bike facilities (i.e., bike lanes, paved paths, and shared roadways) have been added to the urbanized region of Southern Nevada. In total, the region now has more than 1,000 miles of bike facilities. The map below includes an inventory of the bicycle facilities and amenities in the region.

Click the top-right buttons to view the map legend and the list of map layers.

Source: Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada